Gatsby’s Grand Adventure, 2, by Barbara Cairns

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We enjoyed Gatsby’s first grand adventure so much, I think we should take a look at his second.

If you remember, Gatsby is the cat that lives with Miss Annabelle. He just can’t resist jumping into the paintings in Miss Annabelle’s art gallery. His first adventure was with the boys playing snap the whip in Winslow Homer’s “Snap the Whip.” The second adventure, by Barbara Cairns, is titled Gatsby’s Grand Adventure, 2: August Renoir’s “The Apple Seller.”

Everything would be fine if Gatsby remembered to leave the paintings before daybreak. But sometimes, time gets away from him.

That’s what happened when Gatsby is chased up a tree by the little black dog in Pierre August Renoir’s “The Apple Seller.” The apple seller with her basket of apples, two little girls, and the mother of the two girls, run after the animals, and finally, one of the little girls scoops up the dog. He escapes from her, but in the meantime, Gatsby gets away and returns to the art gallery. UT OH! He left behind a mess!

It takes Gatsby two more nights of jumping into the painting to set things straight.

Eugene Ruble’s illustrations again show Gatsby as the enthusiastic, bouncy ball of grey and white fur. The line drawings filled with watercolor depict the scenery and characters of the story in pleasant pastels with lots of movement and activity. In contrast, the apple seller is dressed in dark colors and the little dog is black. The apples are a delicious red.

It’s a treat to see a small reproduction of Renoir’s “The Apple Seller,” rendered in the artist’s soft, feathery style. The biography of Renoir at the end of the book is an excellent introduction to this great artist.

Mrs. Cairns has promised us more adventures starring the inquisitive cat, Gatsby.

Gatsby Grand Adventures series can be found at Guardian Angel Publishing bookstore, as well as other bookstores.

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The Booker Award

Review of Isosceles by Scott R. Caseley

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This World of Ink Tour is dedicated to the young adult novel, ISOSCELES, by Scott R. Caseley, published by MuseItUp Publishing. Congratulations, Scott, for an interesting look into the problems and psychology of children and teens.

On the very first day of Sean McIntyre and Trey Goodsby’s acquaintance in first grade,  we see the warning signs that this relationship is bound for trouble. As Trey builds a structure of blocks, Sean (jealous of the attention directed at Trey) throws a triangular block at him, but the block hits another first-grader, Madeline Edwards. Soon the reader realizes charming Trey has a talent for mischief-making leadership. Sean remains the quiet follower, and Madeline becomes the third member of this unusual grouping.

Then it happens that Sean’s mother and Trey’s father knew each other years ago and now decided to finish what they had started. So the two families break up. The two boys are unhappy, and defiant Trey leads Sean into to stealing. Trey predicts Sean and Madeline will marry, but it seems unlikely since they are simply friends.

As the three friends progress through school, Madeline tries to smooth things over between the boys and  their truant parents, to no avail. Trey continues to steal things, but when Sean’s mother warns him about Trey, Sean is resentful. His father says:

“She worries, Sean. That’s all. She’s just doing her motherly duty letting you

know she cares how you choose to live your life,” he said with tenderness.

“Was it part of her ‘motherly duty’ to leave us?” As I asked the question, the

color left his face, his eyes lost all expression, and he walked out of the room

without saying another word. As I had when Trey rode off on stolen bicycle, I just

watched Pop leave while I remained motionless not knowing what to do or say. I

felt a surge of guilt in an instant. One day, I prayed I’d be able to say the right

things to help someone. Never again, I vowed would I make anyone feel pain by

my words or my silence.

The game of MASH predicts that Madeline will marry Sean, but she says she never thought of him in those terms; and this years after Trey had predicted the very same thing.

Sean’s mother dies of an aneurism and the reception following the funeral is at Sean’s home. Madeline’s mother had committed suicide when she was a little girl.

The triangle drifts apart through the high school years. Then after  years of separation, the three go to a dance together. The evening turns out to be a date for Trey and Madeline while Sean becomes a wall flower.

Over the course of the story, Madeline falls in love with Trey, Sean falls in love with Madeline, and Trey loves all the girls. A lop-sided threesome. Madeline tries unsuccessfully to improve Trey, but he continues to lie and even drops out of school. Trey makes love to Madeline, but feels so guilty he tries to kill himself. His self-loathing finally makes him succeed and Sean gives a touching eulogy at Trey’s funeral.

Though Trey dies, there is a somewhat happy ending with an enduring hopeful prospect.

The finer psychological points are revealed slowly throughout the story, so I’ll leave it to you, dear reader, to decide which leg of the isosceles triangle was the short one.

ISOSCELES is available at MuseItUp Publishing and other fine book stores: http://museituppublishing.com/bookstore2/index.php?page=shop.product_details&flypage=flypage.tpl&product_id=562&category_id=53&option=com_virtuemart&Itemid=1

I enjoyed reading the review copy supplied by Virginia Grenier of World of Ink Tours.

Review of Barbara Cairns’ Gatsby’s Grand Adventure

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I’m happy to present a recent addition to the Guardian Angel Publishing family, Barbara Cairns, whose picture book is illustrated by a familiar GAP illustrator, Eugene Ruble.

In Gatsby’s Grand Adventure we get a double helping of artistic fare. No—make that a triple helping. We have Barbara’s colorful, energetic writing, Eugene’s amusing illustrations, and Winslow Homer’s realistic, homey Americana paintings.

Gatsby

Barbara presents the problem right up front. “Gatsby the cat lived in Miss Annabelle’s art gallery. At night, he had the most peculiar habit. He jumped into famous paintings. When he remembered to jump out before sunrise, everything was fine. But sometimes, Gatsby forgot.”

Ut, oh. Did you see the word “WHEN”? I think we have one of those “when”s coming up.

And what more fun painting for Gatsby to jump into than Winslow Homer’s “Crack the Whip”!

In the painting, eight boys are playing crack the whip in front of a small one-room schoolhouse. Homer captures the spirit of fun and freedom of children of the 1870s (check out those clothes).

If you or your child, grandchild, or school class don’t know how to play crack the whip—you must take a look at this painting. Kids used to have hilarious fun without gadgetry—just friends.

Eugene not only had to reproduce Homer’s subjects, but add Cairns’ characters as well. And they are Gatsby the cat, his Mistress Miss Annabelle, and a mouse and a dog. He even goes inside the schoolhouse. And he does it smoothly and convincingly, integrating past and present.

Barbara’s main character, Gatsby, has a penchant for entering the paintings in the gallery. But when he enters “Crack the Whip,” he causes a minor problem. It’s funny the way one problem leads to another until Gatsby finally sets things right.

Gatsby’s now looking forward to more adventures with the new paintings set to arrive soon. But that’s another story.

This entertaining and educational book is available at Guardian Angel Publishing bookstore and other fine book stores . http://www.guardianangelpublishing.com/gatsby-snap-the-whip.htm

My review copy was provided by the author. I enjoyed reading it and reviewing it.

Fabulous Blog Ribbon2

literary classics GOLD AWARD SEAL

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Sunshine Blogger Award

My fellow Guardian Angel Publishing author, Penelope Ann Cole, has passed on to me the Sunshine Blogger Award.

Thank you, Penny, for this honor.

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I will tell you about some of my favorite things so you can get to know me better:
Favorite Color – Rainbow
Favorite Animal –at the moment, Elephants, because I’m working on a story about an elephant
Favorite Number – 10, that’s how many grandchildren and great-grandchildren I have, combined
Favorite Drink – Gatorade (purple) mixed with cran-grape juice
Facebook or Twitter – don’t care much for either
Your Passions –Writing/Wild Flowers/Ecology
Giving or getting presents – Giving and getting
Favorite Day –Saturday. This is a holdover from when I was teaching–sleep in!
Favorite Flowers – Milkweed/Passion vine/Roses/Princess flower

I am now extending this honor of the Sunshine Award to 3 more Bloggers.

This prize is given to “bloggers who positively and creatively inspire others in the blogosphere.” 

 

The 3 blogs I have awarded are listed below. A huge hug and thank you to each of  these bloggers for inspiring me with their knowledge, humor, and creativity:

Maggie Lyons: http://www.maggie-lyons.blogspot.com

Maggie’s blog is sunshine manifest; a smorgasbord of literary ideas.

 

Tina Cho: http://tinamcho.wordpress.com

Tina’s Tidbits is a glimpse into an active mind. If you need inspiration, go here.

 

Laura Sassi: http://laurasassitales.wordpress.com

Laura’s blog is a place that celebrates writing, reading, and life. It’s a joy simply to look at her home page.

 
Thank you, Maggie, Tina, and Laura for bringing SUNSHINE into the lives of children with your books.

 

Review of Penelope Anne Cole’s Magical Matthew

It is my pleasure to introduce Penelope Anne Cole and her picture book for kids ages 4-9, Magical Matthew.  This books is published by Guardian Angel Publising

 

 

 

 

Penelope Anne Cole is an observer. When she noticed a child moving into “double digits,” she wondered how she could put this aging process into a book for children. Magical Matthew is the result. She herself is much like Matthew; she has worked helping people as a Human Resources person and as a teacher. Ms. Cole has a Multiple Subject Teaching Credential from San Jose State University and a Masters in Human Development Education from the University of Maryland.

What kid wouldn’t want to have special powers—like the one Matthew has? Matthew can magically fix things, but he keeps it a secret for a long time. It’s important that whoever learns about the secret can be trusted. Lily, Matthew’s good friend, helps him find things that need to be fixed. When she figures out about the secret power, Matthew shares everything with his grandma. Grandma wonders if Lily can be trusted and Matthew says he thinks she can. But suddenly Matthew no longer has his power. He lost his last baby tooth and this is a signal that he’s getting too old. At first he’s angry, but Grandma convinces him there are other ways to fix things, even though those ways take more effort. He and Lily will continue to do good deeds. But the power to fix things isn’t lost. When you read the book you will see how the spirit of helpfulness lives on!

Kevin Collier’s illustrations show just how excited and astonished Matthew is when he realizes he has this power and later, his disappointment when he outgrows it. It’s very interesting the way Kevin interpreted Penelope’s poem about the way Matthew sees himself. Together, Penelope and Kevin have created characters whom young readers will be happy to know and parents will find trustworthy.

disclaimer: I purchased a copy of Magical Matthew from Guardian Angel Publishing http://www.guardianangelpublishing.com/matthew.htm in order to review it. I enjoyed it and think it is a worthwhile book to  add to any child’s collection. The book is also available at Amazon and Barnes and Nobel.

BOO !! and The Next Big Thing !!

 

 

 

 

 

 

Boo!

HI Folks,

Hope I didn’t scare you too much, there.

I am participating in THE NEXT BIG THING Blog Hop, and I have been asked to answer some questions about my Work in Progress.

But before I do, let me mention that this blog hop will continue next week on the blogs of Shellie Neumeier and Jayne Moraski. You will find their blog addys down at the end of this post.

And I want to thank Penelope Anne Cole for inviting me to participate and look forward to The Next Big Works of Literature here and in the other postings.

  • Ten Interview Questions for The Next Big Thing Blog Hop:What is the working title of your book? RANIL AND THE BABY ELEPHANT.

    Where did the idea come from for the book? I LEARNED ABOUT AN INDIVIDUAL WHO WAS WORKING TO HELP THE ELEPHANT SITUATION IN SRI LANKA IN AN ARTICLE IN THE SMITHSONIAN MAGAZINE. THE SAD THING IS THAT ELEPHANTS ARE LOOSING THEIR HABITAT BECAUSE IT TAKES FORWARD THINKING PEOPLE TO PLAN AND IMPLIMENT WAYS FOR ELEPHANTS AND PEOPLE TO SHARE A SMALL-ISH ISLAND.

    What genre does your book fall under? MIDDLE GRADE CONTEMPORARY FICTION.

    Which actors would you choose to play your characters in a movie rendition? SINCE THE CHARACTERS IN THE STORY ARE SRI LANKAN, I CAN’T NAME SPECIFIC ACTORS. MAYBE ONE OF THE KIDS FROM “SLUM DOG MILIONAIRE.”

    What is the one-sentence synopsis of your book? IN ORDER TO SAVE THE BABY ELEPHANT FROM BEING TAKEN BY A CIRCUS, RANIL MUST COME UP WITH A WAY TO MAKE MONEY IN HIS VILLAGE.

    Will your book be self-published or represented by an agency? I WOULD BE VERY HAPPY IF MY BOOK WERE TAKEN UP BY AN AGENCY, BUT IN LIEU OF THAT, I WILL PROBABLY TRY TO GO WITH A TRADITIONAL PUBLISHER.

How long did it take you to write the first draft of your manuscript? THE STORY STARTED OUT AS A MAGAZINE STORY—VERY SHORT. THEN WHEN I DECIDED TO EXPAND IT, IT TOOK ABOUT A YEAR OF WRITING AND RESEARCHING.

What other books would you compare this story to within your genre? SINCE THIS IS AN ENVIRONMENTAL STORY, I WOULD COMPARE IT TO CARL HIAASEN’S HOOT.

Who or What inspired you to write this book? I FEEL TERRIBLE THAT THE ELEPHANTS OF SRI LANKA ARE LOOSING THEIR HABITAT AND THEIR LIVES TO AGRICULTURE.
I SALUTE HELPFUL PEOPLE, SUCH AS KARL WALD, WHO ARE WORKING HARD TO OVERCOME THE PROBLEM.
What else about your book might pique the reader’s interest? THE SOLUTION THAT RANIL COMES UP WITH IS TO START A COMPANY IN HIS VILLAGE TO MAKE PAPER OUT OF ELEPHANT POO.

Now, tune in next Wednesday, November 7, to the following blogs to hear all about Shellie’s and Jayne’s upcoming books.

Shellie Neumeier :  http://shellieneumeier.com

Jayne Moraski : http://jaynemoraski.tumblr.com/

If you would like to read some more blogs about new books, go to Penelope Ann’s blog and work backward:    http://penelopeannecole.blogspot.com/

Link to Children’s Literary Classics Author Spotlight:

http://www.clcawards.org/Author-Spotlight.html

http://www.clcreviews.blogspot.com/
 
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Fantastic Flight’s Gold Award

Spotlight on Maggie Lyons, author

The World of Ink Tours is spotlighting Maggie Lyons, author of the middle grade novel, VIN AND THE DORKY DUET.

Maggie Lyons was born in Wales and brought up in England before gravitating west to Virginia’s coast. She zigzagged her way through a motley variety of careers from orchestral management to law-firm media relations to academic editing. Writing and editing nonfiction for adults brought plenty of satisfaction but nothing like the magic she discovered in writing fiction and nonfiction for children. Several of her articles, poetry, and a chapter book have been published in the children’s magazines Stories for Children Magazine andknowonder!

MAGGIE, WHAT ARE SOME JOBS YOU’VE HAD IN YOUR LIFE? HAVE THEY INFLUENCED AND INSPIRED YOUR WRITING?

For many years I gave private piano lessons to children of all ages, which probably influenced my writing for children in an indirect way. Writing program notes for concerts of the National Symphony Orchestra, Washington, DC and other orchestras in the USA and UK provided the basis for a career of writing in other business fields—yes, the performing arts is a business.  All that nonfiction writing helped my efforts to become a better writer of both nonfiction and fiction, though I’m far from fluent in the art. That’s still an aspiration.  My middle-grade adventure story Vin and the Dorky Duet is directly inspired by my love of music, which found an outlet in my work in performing arts.

MAGGIE, HAVE YOU HAD ANY TRAINING TO BECOME AWRITER?

In terms of formal training, one summer, centuries ago, I attended a short creative writing course at Georgetown University. Informally, all those years of writing business-related nonfiction certainly helped, as have countless pieces of advice from members of my critique group and articles on writing, and reading the works of master writers.

I SEE NOW WHERE VIN GETS HIS PROPENSITY FOR EXAGERATION!

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OPERATION BS COMING UP !!

Magnetic compost heaps, man-eating bubble baths and other disasters erupt when an inventive seventh-grader meets a challenge to win a David Beckham autographed soccer jersey if he can befriend an unsociable nerd and introduce his sister to the nerd’s hunky brother, whose initials just happen to be BS.

The story is about the disasters that pile up when a seventh-grader’s brilliant plan to meet his sister’s challenge takes more than one wrong turn. Life tosses challenges at all of us. It would be incredibly boring if it didn’t. What matters is what we learn from them.

VIN AND THE DORKY DUET  SHOWS MAGGIE’S ABLILITY TO COMPOSE A PLOT AND PEOPLE IT WITH CHARACERS THAT SOUND AS IF THEY COME RIGHT OUT OF A TUPICAL AMERICAN SCHOOL–BUT WITH A SHAKESPEREAN KNACK FOR MIS-ADVENTURE. 

VIN IS A NON-STOP GAB MACHINE OF QUICK-WITTED HUMOR AND EXAGGERATION.

(this is an example of the dry humor:

Although we were in the same seventh-grade homeroom and the same classrooms for a couple of periods, we didn’t sit close to each other and telepathy wasn’t an option.

(and a bit of exaggeration, when the liquid-filled key chain gets broken:

 “Eeuw! What’s that?” Eyeballs squinted at the page through the glass bricks on his nose.

(this episode shows more of Vin’s exaggeration and  Eyeball’s nerdiness:

The ball had cracked, spilling the whales’ ocean. Eyeballs picked up the key chain with a paper napkin, dropped it on the floor, and dabbed at the page with another clean napkin. Who else but Eyeballs would have had paper napkins in his pocket?

“You’ve stained my library book.”

It surprised me that a nerdy person like Eyeballs could say anything so obvious. He looked at me as if I’d totally destroyed a sacred object, blown up a statue of Einstein or something.

“You could try using bleach. My mom swears by it.” I knew as soon as I’d spoken I shouldn’t have said that.

“First, perhaps you haven’t noticed, but I don’t have any bleach.” Eyeballs’s voice hit me

colder than the gym shower. “Second, you can’t use it on paper. When I get home, I can try to get it out with French chalk and an iron.”

(this bit about Vin’s in-class note shows “boy appeal”:

“Not really, Ms. Foote, but I didn’t write it.” Snitch turned to look directly at me, wrinkled

his nose, and shot out his tongue. He looked like a constipated iguana.

Ms. Foote took the note from Snitch and glared at me.

LET ME ASSURE YOU, DEAR READER, THAT THE DUET WAS PLAYED HARMONIOUSLY.

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MAGGIE, THANKS FOR STEPPING INTO THE SPOTLIGHT ON STORIES A LA MODE.

Follow Maggie Lyons at

Website http://www.maggielyons.yolasite.com

Twitter @maggielyons66

You can find out more about Maggie Lyons’s World of Ink Author/Book Tour at http://tinyurl.com/9t24kgy

To learn more about the World of Ink Tours visit http://worldofinknetwork.com

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Full Media Kit, Photos and more are available upon request electronically.

Available at the Muse Bookstore:

http://museituppublishing.com/bookstore2/index.php?page=shop.product_details&flypage=flypage.tpl&product_id=343&category_id=143&option=com_virtuemart&Itemid=1

Review of Alyce Joy Rininger’s KA-BOOM

Alyce Joy Rininger’s book, KA-BOOM, published by Halo Publishing International, is touring this month with the World of Ink, sponsored by V. S. Grenier. The illustrator, Diane Lucas, shows us a fantasy world any child would itch to get into, with a fairy, cute and funny animals, and a passenger butterfly.

Starting off with a bang, KA-BOOM, opens with the fairy, Sprout, blasting Taylor’s dollhouse to smithereens. Taylor grabs a flyswatter, but she’s determined to be brave. Though Taylor is distrustful of the fairy, they gradually become friends, and Sprout shrinks Taylor down to fairy size so they can go on adventures.

Sprout performs her magic tricks by touching her left wing to her right foot (or is it the right wing to the left foot?) Anyway, she gets the job done in a flurry of noise, light, and smoke.

 

Sprout can’t remember all that she’s supposed to do for Fairy Queen Splaminda Herminda of Spritesville, but she takes on the challenge. It has something to do with helping Taylor develop more compassion, be less suspicious, and believe in unbelievable discoveries.

 

Together the two teensy girls fly out of the house on a blue butterfly because one of Taylor’s wishes is to visit with a chipmunk and hop around on lily pads in the pond. While Taylor and Sprout go about seeking fun activities, danger surrounds them. For one thing, a couple of bad boys, Loozer and Doozer, the Brattz brothers, like to trample little critters. And for another, the Fish Hawk likes to swoop down to the pond and eat anything he can grasp in his talons. Taylor has to watch out for him when she’s riding on the back of Sir Leapsalot, the bullfrog.

But Taylor and Sprout also meet up with some charming characters who are friendly. Snilly Snail is the one who warns them about the Brattz brothers. And Miss Chipsie, the chipmunk, serves them her sassafras tea in pignut shells.

One of the humorous things is that Miss Chipsie’s blueberry bowl is actually Taylor’s missing tea cup from her tea set. But Taylor is becoming very generous, and she urges Miss Chipsie to keep the bowl (tea cup).

Sprout, with help from her friends, keeps Taylor safe through all their adventures and brings her back home where she adjusts her size back to normal. Sprout is sure the fairy Queen will be pleased with the way she handled Taylor.

Sprout wears a golden disk on a chain around her neck that tells something about what she’s doing or feeling. When she first arrives, she’s ZONKED.  The she runs the gamut from  HOPEFUL, DANGER, RELAX,  SPROUT CLOUTS (when she bested the fish hawk), PRIDE, and all the way back to KA-BOOM!

Lots of humor comes out in Sprout’s vocabulary. She loves to spout fancy words, and if there isn’t one, she makes one up. Here is a list of some of the words that the reader will find at the end of the book:

●Bedraggled……………………… limp, soiled and frayed.

• Bippityhooed………………….. one of Sprout’s words….loud, silly laughter.

• Camouflaged………………….. designed to look like natural surroundings.

• Cumbersome……………..….. difficult to manage because of bulk or shape.

• Discombobulated…………….. thrown into a state of confusion.

• Endeavored……………………. made a serious effort…struggled.

Follow Alyce Joy at: Website http://alycejoy.com

KA-BOOM is available at:  Publisher http://www.halopublishing.com/bookstore/Ka-Boom

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I was provided with a review copy of the book for providing an honest review.

Review of Liam Maher’s THE PLUMBER AND THE WISHING WELL

Here’s another extraordinary picture book from storyteller, Liam Maher, and illustrator, Gin May. THE PLUMBER AND THE WISHING WELL is published by Guardian Angel Publishing.

The plumber is in a quandary because he lost his job and has no money with which to buy Christmas presents for his family. His friend Tupo Hoopoe flies to visit Oracle Owl to see if he has any advice. Sure enough, he does.

Oracle Owl sends Tupo to the Wishing Well, where from the tall fir tree, he sees something unexpected.

Then the scene changes as three magical creatures approach the Well: an elf, a fairy, and a leprechaun. Each one wants to make a wish.  The elf wants a robot to do his wife’s housecleaning; the fairy wants a white horse for her fiancé; and the leprechaun wants a gold bar for the Leprechaun King.

Now they are up against a quandary, too. Their wishes do not come true, even though they tossed golden coins into the well over their left shoulders as they had always done.

Tupo Hoopoe offers to go get the plumber to fix the well. The three magical characters accept his offer and the plumber comes.

The plumber is tall enough to look down into the well and see the problem. Now he’s both a clever and generous person, so he comes up with a surprising and fun solution that makes everybody happy.

The magicals all get their Christmas wishes and the plumber has enough money to buy his wife and son and daughter nice gifts. Even the plumber’s donkey wishes the fairy’s horse (the one she wished for as a gift for her fiancé) a Happy Christmas and it’s reciprocated.

Gin May’s illustrations capture the place and emotions of the characters perfectly in a variety of ways, from pastel to jewel colors and even a captivating silhouette. She does a fantastic job with the birds.

Liam Maher grew up in the beautiful gardens of Dromoland Castle in County Clare, Ireland.

This and the surrounding picturesque countryside coupled with the old beliefs during his boyhood days of leprechauns, ghosts and fairies were to inspire his children’s stories that were to come in later life and originally written for his grandchildren.

Liam has had two other books published with Guardian Angel, The Golden Daffodils and Mr. Topper, the Lucky Potbellied Pig. More are coming soon.

Liam spends his time gardening, keeping fit, entertaining his grandchildren and searching for leprechauns.

Here’s the buy link for The Plumber and the Wishing Well at Guardian Angel Publishing:

http://www.guardianangelpublishing.com/plumber-wishing-well.htm

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My Blogging Awards

How nice to come home from a week in North Carolina celebrating the Fourth of July to find a surprise in my Inbox. I’ve been tagged.

These Awards were passed to me by a terrific blogger, Mirka Breen. If you haven’t already read my review of her middle grade novel, The Voice of Thunder, you can find it in the post for June 16. Her Mirka Muse blog address is: http://mirkabreen.blogspot.com/

Here is one of the Awards:

For the Fabulous Blog Ribbon, I get to name five things I like and five I don’t.

Five things I like:

  1. Reese’s Peanut Butter Cups
  2. Wild flowers
  3. Bugs
  4. Children’s books
  5. Art Deco

Five things I don’t like:

  1. Litterbugs and all forms of disrespect of the Earth
  2. Tailgaters
  3. Rudeness
  4. Cold weather
  5. Horror movies

Next is The Booker Award

The Booker Award comes with the request that I name five favorite books. My list of favorite books is a mile long, so I will name five that just pop into my head.

  1. Miss Hickory by Carolyn Sherwin Bailey
  2. The Skull of Truth: A Magic Shop book by Bruce Coville
  3. Blackwater by Eve Bunting
  4. Millions of Cats by Wanda Gag
  5. David Copperfield by Charles Dickens

Those who know me well know I refuse to live in the real world.

Now I get to pass both awards to SIX WORTHY BLOGGERS:

Bill Kirk: http://www.billkirkwrites.com/

Holly Owen:  http://vanishingveil.com/

Carrie Clickard:  http://www.clclickard.com/

Diane Kress Hower:  http://dkhower.blogspot.com/

Joanne Lamond:  http://joannelamond.coffeecup.com/Home.html

Priya Iyengar:  http://everythingmattersinlife.wordpress.com/home/

Check these bloggers out. They are all fabulous writers of children’s stories and I am honored to be in their company.

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